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An Ode to Dairy

Drinks, Emma Beauchamp, Find Local Food, Recipes, Southeast Michigan, Specialty Producers

When was the last time you truly appreciated the milk in your fridge? Do you know where it comes from and how the cows were treated? Sure, milk is good on cereal and with chocolate chip cookies, but what about all of the other great things it can be become?

This week, I stocked up on all sorts of delicious dairy from Michigan Dairy Farms, specifically Calder Dairy and Guernsey Dairy. Calder Dairy of Lincoln Park, MI has been around since 1946. To this day they still deliver straight to people’s home. Guernsey Dairy of Northville, MI is committed to providing the same great products that they have since 1940. Both of these local milk producers provide a wide array of products perfect for drinking or creating with.

I bought heavy whipping cream, buttermilk, natural milk (creamline or non-homogenized). From there, I marveled at the possibilities that can be done with these ingredients.

Here are some easy links to follow for great ways to use dairy: mascarpone, tiramisuricotta, a ricotta berry cake, chocolate pudding and whipped cream.

I didn’t get a chance to make it, but Butter is also super easy to make. Check out this fun video from my favorite Test Kitchen Manager at Bon Appetit magazine on how to make cultured butter.

Sure, mascarpone, ricotta, and butter can all easily be bought. But there is a sense of satisfaction that comes with making it yourself. Plus, when you make your own, you can often save money in doing so. Making 2 cups of Mascarpone cost me $3.50 — I’ve seen it between $3-8.50 per cup!

Copy of IMG_4483Here’s how I made Mascarpone cheese:

Mascarpone is a super rich soft cheese, often used in tiramisu and cheesecake recipes. It is made out of only two ingredients, heavy whipping cream and a citric acid, like lemon juice.

Copy of IMG_4492I slowly brought 2 cups of heavy cream to 180 degrees Fahrenheit and kept it there for about 3 minutes. Then, I added 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. I kept it at 180 for another 3 minutes. Turned off the heat and stepped away for 30 minutes.  

I lined a strainer with a few layers of cheesecloth and carefully poured the cream mixture into the bowl and let it strain overnight.

Voila! Mascarpone cheese. I didn’t have the patience to make tiramisu before trying it, so I slathered it on toast with some homemade raspberry jam. (Is my millennial showing?)

What are you planning on making?

Emma Beauchamp is the Communications Manager for TLD. She enjoys experimenting in the kitchen and cooking for other people. Contact her at emma@localdifference.org

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Elegance & Good Taste in Hamtramck

Drinks, Edible WOW, Find Local Food, Nina Ignaczak, Southeast Michigan, Uncategorized

An early October sun is setting over the storefronts of Joseph Campau Avenue in Hamtramck. It’s Friday night, and small groups of people filter casually into Peter Dalinowski’s permanent pop-up venue, (revolver). A few guests carry their own bottles of wine as they are seated family-style around candlelit wood block tables. It’s the first seating of the season after a brief summer hiatus, and the anticipation is palpable.

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Scholarships Available for National Farm to Cafeteria Conference

Event, Find Local Food, Kelly Wilson

The National Farm to School Network is hosting the 9th National Farm to Cafeteria Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 25-27, 2018. Individuals and organizations that are working to improve our food system, strengthen community health, empower youth, build racial equity and increase opportunities for farmers and producers are encouraged to attend.

Scholarship applications are being accepted now through Monday, February 12 at 8pm ET. All interested attendees are invited to apply for scholarships to reduce the cost of participating in the conference. To ensure the conference reflects the full diversity of farm to cafeteria constituents, scholarships are prioritized for farmers and farm support organizations, farm to college/hospital practitioners, early care and education providers, food service professionals, persons of color, and youth (through age 22).
The scholarship application is available at farmtocafeteriaconference.org.

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SAVE THE DATE: Michigan Good Food Summit, Oct. 22, 2018

Event, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Kelly Wilson

This October, the Michigan Good Food Summit will amplify underrepresented voices across the food system as we continue advancing the Good Food Charter’s vision of equity, sustainability and a thriving economy for all of Michigan and its people. Whether you’re a food consumer, grower or buyer; line cook, server or chef; advocate, educator or policymaker – join us in East Lansing to connect with others advancing good food and equity in Michigan!

Registration for this event will be open by July 1, 2018.
For questions on registration and sponsor/exhibitor information, contact Diane Drago at ddrago@dmsevents.com or (734) 747-2746.

More information: www.canr.msu.edu/michiganfood/summits/

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Calling all CSA Farmers!

Economy, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Kelly Wilson

The Michigan Statewide CSA Working Group announces the release of the first Michigan CSA Farm Survey. Data from this survey serves as a critical underpinning toward developing broad strategies to support Michigan’s CSA farmers and their communities.

If you are currently a CSA farmer, or have had a CSA operation in the past, please consider taking this survey. Individual responses will be kept confidential. Aggregated data and analysis will be used to inform local and state agencies how to proactively address the needs of Michigan’s CSA farms and farmers.

Survey Link: http://bit.ly/MICSASurvey

Questions: MiCSAsurvey@gmail.com

The Michigan Statewide CSA Working Group includes:

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Winter on the Farm: Leelanau Peninsula Maple Sugar Bush

Bailey Samp, Find Local Food, Specialty Producers

“You can’t make syrup just anywhere. It requires all the seasons to prompt the trees to give their sweet nectar! The long nights of Winter eventually give way to Spring, and then the hustle and bustle of the syrup season brings sweet reward.”

Join me this month as we’ll take a look into the lives of two maple syrup farmers, Margo and Allen Ammons, as they share their love for syrup making, the joy of being outside in the woods, and the anticipation of the season.

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Linking the Message: Heart Health Month and Eating Disorders Awareness Week

Health, Paula Martin

February is Heart Health Month and also includes Eating Disorders Awareness Week.

Heart Health is a primary concern for those with disordered eating patterns. Disordered eating can cause heart health to suffer. The links are clear:
 The restriction of calories, food, and beverages causes rapid weight loss, and malnutrition, leading to accelerated muscle loss, and the heart muscle will weaken
 Significant changes or shifts in body weight can cause sudden cardiac arrest with permanent damage to the heart
 Certain disordered eating behaviors harm the electrolyte balance between sodium and potassium, promote dehydration, and may lower blood pressure or cause a slowing of the heart rate all of which are serious problems for heart health
 Binge eating or compulsive overeating may lead to high blood pressure, accumulation of fat deposits around the heart muscle, high cholesterol, diabetes and hormonal imbalances, which are known risk factors for the heart.

Disordered eating is a stress on the body; this stress can affect both physical and emotional health. Here are some suggestions to move into a heart-positive state of mind:

Feed your heart
Feeding your heart means learning to enjoy the power of healthful eating. It means learning to relate to food as nourishing friend, rather than a fattening enemy, and giving you permission to enjoy all foods. Feeding your heart means learning to fuel your body for health and wellness rather than eating in response to emotions –eating because “I’m stressed “ or recreation, as in “I’m bored”. Nourishment is found in our local fruits, vegetables, whole grains and reduced fat milk products.

Move your heart
Moving your heart means returning to the joy of childhood play. It means forgetting the ‘should’ about exercise, and changing the concept from grueling work-out to burn calories for weight loss to zestful playtime. Moving your heart is also the best way to keep physical hunger signals on cue and to naturally lift a sagging sprit.

Love your heart
Loving your heart and the body in which it resides is very hard in our fat-phobic, diet-obsessed world. It means accepting the diversity of human bodies and recognizing that no one should be discriminated against because of the shape of their skin. Loving your heart means celebrating your uniqueness, your many abilities and finally making friends with the mirror on the wall.

This information was adapted from D.Hayes, 1996 Moving Away from Diets.

Paula Martin, MS, RDN, LDN, is a registered dietitian and TLD’s Community Health Coordinator. Contact her at health@localdifference.org 

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Know Thy Farmer

Find Local Food, Gabe Lava, Guest Post, restaurant

I moved up from Chicago to Traverse City in the spring of 2017, bringing with me the desire to connect to the local landscape and growing community as much as possible. I found a good fit when first interviewing with Simon Joseph, Chef/Owner of Just In Time Hospitality, listening to his description of the noodles they use at Gaijin. The foundation of any ramen shop is its noodles, and beyond the homework done on the technique, what stood out to me was the commitment to using 100% non-GMO, local wheats from Grand Traverse and Leelanau counties.