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Welcome to the Hacienda de Gutierrez

Cara Catallo, Edible WOW, Find Local Food, Southeast Michigan, Specialty Producers

Lydia Gutierrez works.

She works as president of Hacienda Mexican Foods in Detroit. She works as a stellar community leader in, and as a fervent ambassador of, southwest Detroit. And she works a room she passes through, embracing her employees like family as she asks about their weekend, genuinely interested.

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Lady Jane Gourmet Seed Co.: Hemp & Health

Find Local Food, Guest Post, Health, Laura Noble, Specialty Producers

In an era when many food products are processed and modified, Lady Jane Gourmet Seed Co seeks to provide better access to healthy, whole food options. Based in Metamora, Michigan, this artisan, gluten-free food manufacture focuses on making products from nutritionally dense hemp seeds.

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Bløm Meadworks Highlights Michigan Ingredients and Growers

Drinks, Erica Bloom, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Southeast Michigan, Specialty Producers

Lauren Bloom and Matt Ritchey don’t have much time these days for anything that doesn’t ferment. The couple is putting in long hours at their new business, Bløm Meadworks, a space for mead enthusiasts and those trying the beverage for the first time. “We wanted to build a business around what we love to drink and share that with Ann Arbor,” says Lauren.

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Lavender Lane: A Scent-Sational Farm

Environment, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Joe Pusta, Specialty Producers

Lavender Lane is a specialty lavender farm located 15 minutes south of Ann Arbor in Milan.  As educators, my wife and I founded our farm in 2014 and have since expanded it to include over 5,000 plants; we grow over 16 varieties of lavender in colors of purple, pink, white and blue! Aside from its scent-sational aroma and breathtaking views, lavender keeps its appealing scent for years, can be used in cooking, promotes sound sleep, uplifts one’s mood and calms the mind and body!

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Growing Together: Fostering Creation in Shared Space

Economy, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Kelly Wilson, Learn More, Southeast Michigan, Specialty Producers

All your friends beg for your famous granola for holiday and birthday gifts. You find yourself spending hours in the kitchen and everyone encourages you to start selling your granola at the local farmers market. Thanks to the Michigan Cottage Food Law, you’re able to make your granola in your kitchen and sell it at the farmers market. However, your kitchen is quickly becoming too small to keep up with production demands and you want to start selling to the local grocery store. In order to grow your business, you need commercial kitchen space. Constructing a commercial kitchen that meets state licensing requirements, however, is more than your small business can afford. Fortunately for you, there is a shared kitchen space in town: Proud Mitten Shared Kitchen!

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Lady Jane Seed Co.: Understanding the Hemp Plant

Environment, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Health, Kelly Wilson, Laura Noble, Specialty Producers

Hemp is a plant we’re hearing more about these days. However, there is a lot of confusion around this delicious and versatile plant. Many people wonder if hemp and marijuana are the same plant or are concerned they may fail a drug test or get high from eating hemp. An internet search can lead to even more confusion! This article sheds light on hemp history and clarifies a few of the common misconceptions regarding this important plant.

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A Fresh Catch and What It Really Means to Eat Local Food

Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Sarah Peschel, Specialty Producers

Here in Northern Michigan, we have the option – and the luxury – of buying and consuming a cornucopia of raw and processed food products procured right here in the Great Lakes State.

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Becoming a Big Fish in a Summer Pond

Drinks, Find Local Food, Molly Stepanski, Specialty Producers

Ponder for a moment the number of people that metro San Diego is home to (about 3 ½ million)…and consider all the locally sourced food and beer they have access to in that big city (hint: it’s A LOT). Next envision that same number of people coming through a tiny village on the northern tip of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, squeezed in over only three to four months of the year. Now imagine only having one small, burgeoning brewery in that entire town to service all those travelers in that short span of time.

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March Maple Madness

Find Local Food, Molly Stepanski, Specialty Producers

This year marked the 6th Annual Michigan Maple Weekend (March 24th-25th in NE Michigan), although the weather didn’t want to cooperate. There’s a pattern of freezing and thawing once spring hits, which builds up pressure within the trees and causes sap to flow. It was bitterly cold as I walked around 4D Acre Maple to check out their set up.

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Local Shade of Pale

Drinks, farm-to-table, Find Local Food, Simon Joseph, Specialty Producers, Traverse City

Food Philosophy
I personally think it is not only important for us to use as much locally produced food and products as possible, but we also have a responsibility to be good partners with all food businesses in the area. It helps elevate the whole industry in a way that benefits us beyond dollars. Eating local should be looked at as the norm, not the exception.

Drink Local
When we re-opened Harvest in its new location in 2017, we also added a liquor license and one of our first priorities was to source beer and cider from local producers. That led to the idea of having a beer brewed specifically for us. It only made sense that we would take the idea as far as we could by then brewing the beer with local malt and hops. Because of the amazing relationships in the food and brewing community in Traverse City this was not a tall order. Working with Earthen Ales, Great Lakes Malting, and Michigan Hop Alliance we were able to brew a beer that is almost entirely made out of locally sourced ingredients, aptly named Local Shade of Pale. It’s really amazing to think of how far and fast the brewing culture has come in just a few short years. We feel so fortunate to not only enjoy the work of these great folks but also to be able to collaborate with them to create something that exemplifies our common goals.

Q&A with our Partners
Michigan Hop Alliance
Brian Tennis, FounderBrian Tennis Michigan Hop Alliance

Established: Michigan Hop Alliance was started 7 years ago as a way for hop farmers to work together to bring their hops to the brewing community as economically as possible. New Mission Organics was started 13 years ago, and has been growing hops for 10 years. New Mission Organics was the original farm name.

What makes Northern Michigan hops unique and great?
The 45th Parallel has historically been the sweet spot for growing hops, both in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. We have the perfect climate, including soil, water, heat, and day lengths, to be able to grow a world-class product. We are also lucky to be able to work with some of the best farmers in Michigan, and can leverage their knowledge and expertise to our overall farming operation.  

What does it mean to you to be involved in brewing a beer for a local restaurant with local brewers and local malt providers with your local hops?
We have been growing hops for nearly a decade, and have sold over a million pounds of hops over the years, but there is still something that is so very special and rewarding as tasting a beer that was made from hops that you had a hand in. To me, that excitement never gets old. These brewers and restaurateurs are not just accounts, but my friends, and I share their passion. My very first commercial sale was to Short’s Brewing Company and was used in a harvest ale called Kind Ale. I still remember the very first time I saw our hopyard name up on the chalkboard in Bellaire and the rush I had from tasting that beer. That proud moment doesn’t leave you.

Great Lakes Malting Company
Jeff Malkiewicz, President & Co-Founder

TLD.GLMC-8Established: Great Lakes Malting Company has been crafting great malt from the Great Lakes since 2016, with the mission of producing the finest malts right here in Traverse City and connecting breweries and distilleries to the region with locally-grown and processed ingredients.

Why do you believe in locally sourcing barley?
The answer is two-fold, economic and sustainability. When brewers/distillers use locally grown and processed ingredients, all of that money stays in the community and is re-invested in the community. Also, sourcing locally reduces carbon footprint through reduced transport. Most ingredients that are currently being used by breweries and distilleries come from the Western US/Western Canada and from overseas.

Describe your relationships with local farmers.
One of the things I enjoy most about this opportunity is my interaction with farmers. After all, quality malt starts at the farm. We can’t produce the finest malts without the finest grains! I have spent a lot of time working with farmers and educating them to help ensure their success in growing malting-grade barley. However, farming is not always easy and sometimes difficult conversations take place. This is where mutual trust and respect are critical to maintaining and growing these relationships.

Earthen Ales
Jamie Kidwell-Brix, Co-Founder/Brewer

earthenales brew dayEstablished: Earthen Ales opened its doors in December 2016. Owners Andrew and Jamie started Earthen Ales because they love making beer.They were both brewing before they met each other, and when they met and started brewing together – it got out of control, and Earthen Ales was born!

What makes Northern Michigan beer unique and why is using locally sourced ingredients important to you?
The agricultural diversity of the region and access to fresh, clean water makes northern Michigan a great place to make beer. The abundance of ingredients and resources in the area have led to strong and creative food and beverage community; we love being a piece of that community, and hope we’ll contribute to making it even stronger. We used to work in the sustainability field in our former day jobs, and we’ve carried this mindset into brewing. We brew beer with a sense of place, and we’re inspired by the place we live. What better way to showcase this then working with ingredients that are native to this place.

What does it mean to you to be involved in brewing a beer for a local restaurant with local hops providers and local malt providers?
Brewing beer for a restaurant like Harvest is a new extension of our community. We’re excited that Harvest embraces the use of local ingredients daily and wanted to explore this further by collaborating on a beer with us. It’s great to align with other businesses on similar values and ideas. Harvest was excited and inspired by the diversity of new hops in the region, and was particularly excited about using a new varietal called Green Bastard – we’d never used this hop before. And guess what, we like making beer and trying new things too!

Local Shade of Pale is available on-tap at Harvest, Traverse City, as of April 5th.

Harvest

Simon Joseph is the Owner/Managing Partner/Executive Chef of Roaming HarvestHarvestGaijinAlley’s Market . 

Photo Credits: Just In Time Hospitality and Brian Tennis of Michigan Hop Alliance