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Produce to the People! : Growing Hope’s Mobile Farm Market

Emma Beauchamp, Event, Farmers Markets, Get Involved, Southeast Michigan, Stories

“Every mobile farm market is unique to the community it’s in,” said Erica Bloom, the program director of Growing Hope in Ypsilanti. Through their urban farm demos, in-school programs, farmers markets, and more, Growing Hope offers educational opportunities and greater access to healthy foods in the area.“We have been learning together with our partners in Detroit, Lansing, and Flint on how to best bring fresh produce into the neighborhoods.”

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Make sure your farm is counted! 2017 Census of Agriculture

Economy, Emma Beauchamp, Find Local Food, Learn More

Calling all farmers, new and old!

Be sure to register your farm with the 2017 Census of Agriculture before June 30th! 

This census occurs every 5 years and conducts a complete count of all US farms–including the smallest plots of land, rural or urban, as long as they raise or sell at least $1,000 worth of agricultural product during the census year.

What is this information used for? 

This information is used by the Census of Agriculture to influence Congress, agribusiness, policymakers, researchers, local governments and many others on the creation and funding of agricultural programs and services – decisions that can directly impact your local operations and the future of the agriculture industry for years to come.

The survey takes just a moment, so register your farm now: https://www.agcounts.usda.gov/legacy0/cgi-bin/counts

Emma Beauchamp is the Local Food Coordinator for NW Michigan and the Communications Manager for Taste the Local Difference. Contact her at emma@localdifference.org 

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Fire Up the Blowtorch! Rhubarb-Honey Crème Brûlée

Emma Beauchamp, Farmers Markets, Recipes, The Local Dish

Crème Brûlée is so much easier than you think! The hardest part was separating the eggs properly…and waiting for the custards to cool!

This month, I teamed up with my friend Julia, a FoodCorps service member in Traverse City and a former (and soon-to-be-returning) professional pastry chef at Martha’s Leelanau Table in Suttons Bay.

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99% Michigan Local Quiche

Emma Beauchamp, Find Local Food, Recipes

Quiche is one of those things that is harder to mess up than it is to make. Plus, it feeds a crowd, is totally versatile to what you have in your fridge. Basically, you can sub in any vegetables, herbs, cheeses, or spices you would like.

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Spring Newsletter Contest!

Emma Beauchamp, Event, Spring

Hello, hello! Do you feel lucky? Well? Then sign up for our SE Michigan newsletter to be entered to win a prize! Not only that, but you’ll also get the latest local food stories, recipes, and vegetable jokes delivered right to your inbox each month!

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Here’s what you could win:

• 1st Edition screen-printed TLD Apron

•A copy of our 2017 Guides to Local Food for Northern Michigan and Southeast Michigan delivered straight to your door

•$10 to either Ann Arbor Seed Co, or Nature and Nurture Seeds

Follow this link to sign up for our newsletter 

All you have to do is sign up for our Southeastern Michigan newsletter between April 15-30. Then we will contact the winner by email in early May! 

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With questions, contact Emma at emma@localdifference.org

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Fermentation Station: Adventures in Kimchi

Emma Beauchamp, Recipes, The Local Dish

Kimchi is traditionally a salted, fermented cabbage used as a condiment in many Korean dishes. What occurs in kimchi is known as lactofermentation. Through an anaerobic process (meaning without oxygen), our friendly neighborhood bacteria, lactobacillus, (named such because it was originally found in milk cultures), flourishes.

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Heartwarming Winter Root Soup

Emma Beauchamp, Recipes, The Local Dish

Did you know that parsnip is derived from the Latin word “pastus” which means food? Today, the poor parsnips are often overlooked as they literally pale in comparison to their (often) orange cousins, carrots. These unsung heroes are great roasted, mashed, or used to flavor stocks.Traditionally, parsnips had several common uses, from sweetening baked goods before sugar was readily available to being a toothache remedy.