Reclaiming Our Food As Sacred

Bill Palladino, Find Local Food, Record-Eagle Ag Forum

Sacred Food Header

By Bill Palladino

Bill Head Shot PoehlmanWe are deep into the season of sacred traditions. The crisp darkness of winter brings with it many celebrations, each anticipating the light yet to come. And strangely, it is the darkest nights that reveal the most stars. This time of year we are given the gift of seeing things previously unseen. Religious and secular practices call to our attention the longest night of the winter solstice, Hanukkah’s victory of the Maccabees, the transformative fires of Yule, the first fruits and seven principles of Kwanzaa, and the Christmastime birth of Jesus Christ.

The common thread throughout this myriad of sacred traditions, beyond prayer and candles, is the gathering of family and friends, always with celebrations of food. But is it enough to keep food as something sacred only during the holidays? I am fearful we are quickly losing this connection, as the way we eat begins to mirror the brief, staccato, way we’ve come to communicate.

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MDARD Announces Specialty Crop Public Input Opportunity

Get Involved, Learn More, Press Release

For Immediate Release: December 8, 2016

Media Contact: Jessy Sielski, 517-284-5725 

To ensure effective priorities within the Michigan Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, the Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development today announced a public input opportunity, which will be held through January 12, 2017. 

The MDARD Specialty Crop Block Grant Program awards funds to projects to enhance the competitiveness of Michigan specialty crops, which include fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture, and nursery crops (including floriculture). 

Follow this link to complete the specialty crop input questionnaire 

To submit comments, visit www.michigan.gov/mdardgrants or send them via email to mda-grants@michigan.gov. The deadline for comments is January 12, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. The input received will be considered when developing final program priorities for 2017.

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Extending the Growing Season : Hoophouses and the Local Food Economy

Economy, Find Local Food, Tricia Phelps

In a climate like ours, farmers are challenged to turn a profit during a limited growing season. Like any business, there are tools they can use to help overcome these challenges, but the decision to invest in a solution—particularly an expensive one—requires confidence that the tool is worth every penny.

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Easy, Goat Cheese-y Kale Pasta with Toasted Almonds

Emma Beauchamp, Recipes, Specialty Producers

During the week, no one has time to spend hours cooking dinner. This recipe is so quick, that you should be able to prepare everything in the time it takes for the water to boil and the pasta to cook. This recipe below can easily feed a family of four that is full of vitamins from the kale, and protein from the goat cheese and almonds. Plus, it’s likely that you will have almost everything already in your fridge.

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Sowing Seeds for the Future: The Potential for a Food and Farming Housing Cooperative

Economy, Get Involved, Guest Post, Maddy Baroli, Stories

A cooperative living community of farm workers, food service employees, culinary students, agri-business entrepreneurs, and other local food and farming partners could address the intersection of several problems and potentials related to affordable housing in our region. This living community would be open to anyone involved in or serious about getting involved with local food work, and could help lay the foundation for a new generation of farmers.

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Keeping it Local : The Ypsilanti Food Co-op

Economy, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Lisa Bashert, Stories, Uncategorized

Ypsilanti Food Co-op is known for providing value, quality food and knowledge to consumers. With 60 solar panels on our roof, we are known for being dedicated to creating sustainability of the environment and our local economy. We are connected with families whose children have grown up to become staff. We add value to our small community.

And we sell a full line of groceries in a small converted industrial space in historic Depot Town, Ypsilanti. Our focus is on organic, healthy, fair-trade and local foods.