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Shaping our Agricultural Landscape: The Farm Bill

Economy, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Kelly Wilson

Every five years Congress votes on a massive piece of legislation that dramatically influences the landscape and nutrition of our nation:The Farm Bill. This piece of legislation determines what we eat and how it is grown and has huge impacts on public and environmental health. The current (2014) Farm Bill only accounts for 4% of total federal spending and includes 12 titles addressing broad topic areas.

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Christmas Tree Sustainability: Real vs. Artificial

Get Involved, Learn More, Melissa Orzechowski, Uncategorized

Maybe you have similar memories of running around a Christmas tree farm searching the place for the perfect tree, your tree. Every year I look forward to the hunt and to the fresh scent of a real tree in our home. But recently I’ve started to wonder about the sustainability of cutting down millions of trees across the U.S. each year. What about reduce, reuse, recycling? What is better for the environment, a plastic tree or a real one? I decided to look for myself.

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Once Upon a Pasty

Emma Beauchamp, Find Local Food, Recipes, Stories, The Local Dish, Uncategorized

If you’ve been to the Upper Peninsula, you have probably had a pasty. In the 1800s, many Cornish migrants came to the US, particularly the UP, to work in the iron mines. With them, they brought Cornish pasties. These hearty hand pies are traditionally packed with beef, onions, potatoes, and rutabagas. Today, they remain wildly popular throughout the UP and northern Michigan acting as a reminder of Michigan’s mining history.

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Winter on the Farm : Spirit of Walloon

Bailey Samp, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Stories

Often wonder what farmers do during the winter? Do they travel the world, bundle up with a favorite book, or take on new hobbies? Despite appearance, winter is a crucial time for many farmers in Northern Michigan. There is much to be done below the surface during these quiet and cold months!

 

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Transitioning Farmland to the Next Generation of Farmers : Land Access Educational Summit #1

Economy, Event, Kelly Wilson

Join the Southwest Land Access Partners for this educational summit on

February 2, 2018

Kalamazoo Valley College,

Culinary Allied Health Building

9:30 AM- 3:30 PM

As we know, access to land for farming and conservation purposes is vitally important as more and more farmland will change hands in the coming years. Bringing together beginning and retiring farmers in a way that allows for education and networking is one way to bridge the gap to farmland preservation.

The goal of this educational summit is to help landowners understand succession planning as it pertains to land protection and transfer; and to assist beginning farmers in understanding how to acquire land. Cost for this workshop is $20 (Lunch on your own—Havirmill Café available)

Our team, Southwest Land Access Partners, is a group of educators, non-profit organizations and government agencies. This group is an extension of the Good Food Kalamazoo working group focused on farmland use and access in the greater Kalamazoo area.

Participant Registration

Sponsorship Registration

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Tackling Climate Change at your Dinner Table

Find Local Food, Food Waste, Kelly Wilson, Paula Martin, Stories

What we choose to eat has huge implications on the planet’s ability to sustain us. Globally, food production accounts for approximately 33% of our total greenhouse gas emissions. The good news is, collectively, we have the power to mitigate some of the effects of climate change by choosing sustainable dietary patterns.

Learn from TLD’s Registered Dietitians about how your food choices can reduce your climate footprint:

http://naturechange.org/2017/11/21/eating-for-climate-resilience/

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The Coolest Thing About My Job

Economy, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Learn More, Molly Stepanski, Stories

I’m not bragging, but there are a lot of cool things about my job as the NE Local Food Coordinator with Taste the Local Difference. I get to hang out with other local farmers, producers, and small business owners; I get to eat the food they’ve grown or created; drink the libations they’ve conceived; partake of their businesses’ inventions; help put on events celebrating their work; and tell everybody how great this region of Michigan is because of these people and their labors of love. It’s a pretty sweet deal.