shooksfamilyfarm.earlysummer.cmc-34

Understanding Economic Impacts of Local Food

Economy, Environment, Find Local Food, Kathryn Colasanti, Learn More, Megan Phillips Goldenberg

As awareness of local food grows, more people are becoming interested in understanding the economic impacts of local food systems. While many of us may be motivated to buy local food by values like preserving farmland, supporting small businesses, and expanding access to fresh, healthy food, these goals are economic development goals. Economic growth is a much narrower measure centered on increases in jobs and sales, or monetary value. To be sure, economic growth is a limited way of judging success, but there are times when it is helpful to justify food system initiatives in terms of economic growth to decision-makers like funders or local government officials.

Screen Shot 2018-03-06 at 11.53.04 AM

Macomb Food Collaborative hosts annual local food conference

Event, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Guest Post, Kaitlin Wojciak, Learn More, Southeast Michigan

While this conference is a regional event, highlighting the Macomb County food system is the theme of this year’s All About Food Conference. A keynote panel of Macomb County food and beverage business owners will kick off the day, setting the focus on the local context. The speakers will share about their businesses and their role in supporting locally sourced food and locally made adult beverages. The panel will include voices from a vineyard, brewing supply store and a brew house/restaurant.

providencefarm.cmm-5 (2)

New Jobs in Northeast Michigan & The Upper Peninsula

Press Release, Tricia Phelps

Date:  January 6th, 2016

Contact: Tricia Phelps, tricia@localdifference.org, (877) 562-2539

Taste the Local Difference creates jobs, hires new staff members in Northeast Michigan & the Upper Peninsula

Taste the Local Difference® (TLD) is a local food and farm marketing agency, with a mission to sell more local food in the communities they serve.

The TLD program has over 13 years of experience in marketing local farmers, farmers markets, food processors, restaurants and more. They specialize in building relationships and developing new market opportunities throughout the food system, and this local food programming, along with new jobs, is coming to Northeast Michigan and the Upper Peninsula.

New staff members Molly Stepanski and Melissa Orzechowski have been hired by TLD as the regional Local Food Coordinators in Northeast Michigan and the Upper Peninsula, respectively.

TLD’s Local Food Coordinators act as voices for the regional food system, and offer a variety of customized services benefiting the local food and farming communities in their specific geographic areas. The benefits of developing a stronger local food system can lead to more jobs, a thriving regional economy and improved access to healthy food.

TLD is grateful for the support of Northeast Michigan Council of Governments (NEMCOG), the Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development (MDARD), The UP Food Exchange, Marquette Chamber of Commerce and Marquette Food Co-op. These positions were made possible with their involvement.

For more information, please contact Tricia Phelps, (877) 562-2539 tricia@localdifference.org or visit http://localdifference.org.

secondspring.cmm-13 (1)

Extending the Growing Season : Hoophouses and the Local Food Economy

Economy, Find Local Food, Tricia Phelps

In a climate like ours, farmers are challenged to turn a profit during a limited growing season. Like any business, there are tools they can use to help overcome these challenges, but the decision to invest in a solution—particularly an expensive one—requires confidence that the tool is worth every penny.

IMG_2094

Keeping it Local : The Ypsilanti Food Co-op

Economy, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Lisa Bashert, Stories, Uncategorized

Ypsilanti Food Co-op is known for providing value, quality food and knowledge to consumers. With 60 solar panels on our roof, we are known for being dedicated to creating sustainability of the environment and our local economy. We are connected with families whose children have grown up to become staff. We add value to our small community.

And we sell a full line of groceries in a small converted industrial space in historic Depot Town, Ypsilanti. Our focus is on organic, healthy, fair-trade and local foods.