MAEAP Verification is a Worthy Investment for Your Farm

Agriculture, Environment

For this farmer, MAEAP recognition proves he’s doing the right things to keep his farm running for another 100 years

Ron Stadler’s family has been farming since 1896. The family farm sits on 120 acres in Monroe County and has seen its fair share of cash crops and livestock come and go over the years. Nowadays, Ron’s focus is on growing corn, soybeans, and produce. He’s proud to carry on the family farming tradition and does what he can to care for his land, so it stays healthy and productive.

That’s why Ron decided to get involved with the Michigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program (MAEAP). A voluntary program, MAEAP helps Michigan farmers adopt cost-effective practices that reduce erosion and runoff into ponds, streams, and rivers.

A Word on Waste: Part IV

Agriculture, Authors, Climate Change, Environment, Food Waste

This article is part of a four-part series on buying, storing, preserving and composting foods to prevent waste

There is no ‘away’ to throw things. When food ends up in landfills it decomposes anaerobically which releases methane, a greenhouse gas 25x more effective at trapping heat than carbon dioxide. Since Americans throw away around 150,000 tons of food every day, the effect on climate change is significant. Even when we do all we can to reduce food waste by buying only what we need, storing and preserving foods properly, we still end up with inedible scraps or things that have gone off. Here are some basics on composting to divert waste from the landfill. 

Combating Climate Change: Creating Climate-resilient Orchards

Agriculture, Climate Change, Environment, Julia Linder, Learn More

In my previous post of this Climate Change series, (see the first and second post here), I discussed how tree fruit growers in Michigan are faced with adapting to a “new normal” due to climate change. Pest and disease profiles are shifting, frost dates are less predictable, and precipitation is becoming more erratic. Growers adapt to these changes by implementing management strategies like wind machines and irrigation systems. 

National Farmers Union Hosting D.C. Fly-In

Agriculture, Environment, Find Local Food, Kristine Ranger, Learn More

Michigan Farmers Union is seeking participants to advocate for family farmers and their communities by joining members from across the country in Washington, D.C., September 8th-11th for the 2019 Fall Legislative Fly-In.

The Michigan Good Food Charter: Planning for the Next Decade of Good Food

Economy, Environment, Find Local Food, Learn More

TThe 2010 Charter established six goals for an equitable, sustainable, and economically vibrant Michigan food system. As the ten-year mark approaches, time is ripe to examine the progress made and formulate a new vision for the coming decade. 

A New Normal for Michigan Orchards

Climate Change, Environment, Julia Linder, Learn More

This is the second post of a three-part series. Before reading this, make sure you read the first post of the series here! To quickly recap, in the last article I mentioned how climate change will have unique impacts on tree fruit agriculture due to long-term growing requirements of growing perennials. This means that fruit growers also perceive unique risks from climate change, which is what this post will dive into.

Farmer Appreciation: Supporting our Farmers this Season

Economy, Environment, Find Local Food, Kelly Wilson


Farming is a tough business not for the weak of spirit. The rigors of farm life are mentally, intellectually and physically demanding and farm businesses operate under a myriad of variables humans have little control over. Most farmers are motivated to keep up the grueling pace in order to positively change the social and environmental landscape of their communities through healthy food. 

This season, with its historically cool and rainy weather, farming has been especially tough. Plantings are behind. Some crops were lost. Hay can’t be cut. Grazing fields are flooded. Stress is high. We can’t change this season’s weather, but we can stand by our farmers and show them extra appreciation and remind them why they’re doing this important, life giving work.

How will Climate Change Impact Michigan’s Fruit Orchards?

Climate Change, Environment, Get Involved, Julia Linder

There has been a lot of discussion in recent years about how climate change in going to impact agriculture. The Midwest has been characterized by increasing average temperatures, earlier springs, and more frequent extreme precipitation events. For farmers, these changes will mean shifting growing seasons, flooded fields, and longer periods of drought.

Get to Know our Summer Interns

Environment, Event, Get Involved, Health, Jobs

We are excited to host three great interns this summer! In northern Michigan, we have Emily Lesky as our Community Health Intern and Julia Linder as our Communications and Outreach Intern. In Southeast Michigan, Travertine Garcia is our Community Health Intern. These amazing ladies will help Taste the Local Difference further our mission of educating consumers about the benefits of local food and supporting food and farming entrepreneurs.

Eat Small: Roasted Rabbit with Gravy

Alex Palzewicz, Eat Local, Environment, Find Local Food, Proteins, Recipes, Specialty Producers

In 2017, Tim & Naomi decided to start the Happy Hoppers Organic Rabbit Farm. They both grew up with rabbits so it was a natural fit. Originally, they decided to have rabbits for meat, pelts and compost. Rabbit compost is one of the only fresh composts you can put directly on your garden, without it burning your plants. Also, it’s high in nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium which makes it perfect for great growth!