Crop Spot: Arugula

Find Local Food, Health, Kelly Wilson, Learn More

This peppery, pleasant edition to the salad bowl originated as a weed in the Mediterranean region. Since Roman times, however, this plant has been widely cultivated and enjoyed in a variety of dishes and preparations. Historically more common in Europe, especially Italy, arugula is growing in popularity in the United States thanks to its fresh, tart, bitter, and peppery flavor.

United Way of Washtenaw Leads Strategies for Success

Economy, Get Involved, Health, Learn More, Uncategorized

By 2030, we aspire to live in a community where your zip code no longer determines your opportunity in life. United Way of Washtenaw County fights for the health, education, and financial stability of all people. Our mission is to CONNECT people, resources, and organizations TOGETHER to create a thriving community for EVERYONE.

10 Uses for Maple Sap & Syrup

Alex Palzewicz, Environment, Find Local Food, Learn More

Maple syrup is Michigan’s “liquid gold.” It takes 40 gallons of sap from sugar maples to boil down to 1 gallon of syrup. Michigan ranks in the Top 10 in Maple Syrup Production in the United States. Check our favorite ways to incorporate maple syrup into our diets here.

Crop Spot: Radishes

Eat Local, Find Local Food, Kelly Wilson, Learn More, Recipes

After months of gray skies and storage vegetables, the first spring crops are a welcome relief for the eyes and the palette. An often underappreciated crop is the humble, but delicious, spring radish. An edible root vegetable of the Brassicaceae family (it’s cousins are broccoli, kale, collards, and cabbage), radishes come in a variety of colors (yay for antioxidants!) and shapes.

What’s our Why?

Emma Beauchamp, Environment, Learn More

We all have a stake in our food system and environment. Since 2004, Taste the Local Difference has continued to change the culture around local food by promoting the importance of buying and sourcing locally. Each year, we feature thousands of Michigan farmers, brewers, restaurants, local grocers, and more in our 2 magazine-style annual Guides to Local Food. More than that, we work directly with these businesses to excel and to improve Michigan’s local food economy. Our work aims to get more local food sold.

A Farmer’s Diary: Beginning Farmer Institute, Part 3

Event, Get Involved, Learn More, Molly Stepanski

Our third and final Beginning Farmer Institute (BFI) session took us to Washington state to talk business formation, business planning and long-term health, land tenure, credit, taxation, liability, regulatory compliance, farming cooperatives, and the logistics behind one of the oldest continuously operated public farmers’ markets in the United States. You think you know how to farm, start a small business, and market your product? Think again. This program will change your trajectory, and it has for our farm. Not to mention we now have a long list of reliable farmers/producers from around the country that can help us with our farming questions for life!

Crop Spot: Garlic

Find Local Food, Health, Kelly Wilson, Learn More, Recipe, Uncategorized

What is related to onions, leeks and lilies, keeps mythical creatures at bay, enhances the flavor of many dishes, and has antimicrobial properties? If you guessed Allium sativum (aka garlic), then you are correct!

Hailing from Central Asia and Northern Iran, records show garlic has been cultivated and used for culinary and medicinal purposes for nearly 5,000 years. There are two subspecies of garlic which all varieties can be categorized into: hardneck or softneck. Hardneck garlic produces a hard central stalk and scape (which can be harvested for a delicious vegetable side dish or pesto). Hardneck garlic tends to be a bit more flavorful and have larger, easier to peel cloves than softneck varieties. Softneck garlic has no hard central stalk, smaller cloves, and is the type we typically see in the grocery store (Note: nearly all garlic in US grocery stores is imported from China).

5 Favorite Foodie Films

Alex Palzewicz, Books/Films, Eat Local, Food Waste, Learn More

We all turn to film and video for inspiration, escape, education and sometimes even in search of purpose. A well done film will take you on a journey and leave you a new person at the end. The following 5 Foodie Films (documentaries) will get you through the end of winter and keep you creative in the spring! There is no particular order or ranking, just five films that I chose for unique reasons.

seeds starting in hoophouse at loma farm

Seeds for Spring in Michigan

Eat Local, Emma Beauchamp, Environment, farm-to-table, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Gardening, Learn More

Winter continues to drag on in its unforgiving way, but with each day spring is ever nearer. For you farmers and gardeners out there, now is the time to order your seeds for spring. Not all seeds are created equal, so learn why it’s important to opt for earth-enriching seeds here!