Spring Green Kimchi

Find Local Food, Recipe

Most people familiar with kimchi know it as a long-fermented, funky napa cabbage with almost bubbly effervescence. But kimchi is much broader than that. I love long-fermented napa cabbage kimchi in the winter, but when spring comes, I start longing for fresh and sprouty greens. In spring, I enjoy making gutjuri, a sort of fresher, quicker, not-so-fermented version of kimchi. My favorites are cilantro and watercress, but it works wonderfully with arugula, mustard greens, or young lettuce.

Crop Spot: Garlic

Find Local Food, Health, Kelly Wilson, Learn More, Recipe, Uncategorized

What is related to onions, leeks and lilies, keeps mythical creatures at bay, enhances the flavor of many dishes, and has antimicrobial properties? If you guessed Allium sativum (aka garlic), then you are correct!

Hailing from Central Asia and Northern Iran, records show garlic has been cultivated and used for culinary and medicinal purposes for nearly 5,000 years. There are two subspecies of garlic which all varieties can be categorized into: hardneck or softneck. Hardneck garlic produces a hard central stalk and scape (which can be harvested for a delicious vegetable side dish or pesto). Hardneck garlic tends to be a bit more flavorful and have larger, easier to peel cloves than softneck varieties. Softneck garlic has no hard central stalk, smaller cloves, and is the type we typically see in the grocery store (Note: nearly all garlic in US grocery stores is imported from China).

Winter Sweetness: Candy Greens

Eat Local, Find Local Food, Health, Kelly Wilson, Recipe

As our state becomes blanketed in snow, it is easy to think life on the farm grinds to halt. Fortunately for us eaters, however, many farmers utilize hoophouses (aka high tunnels or passive solar greenhouses) to grow a variety of cold hardy winter greens: collards, kale, and spinach are commonly available year round. If you’re normally not a fan of greens, and even if you are, I dare you to try the winter kissed varieties and not fall in love.

Fresh, Frozen or Concentrated: Tis the Season for Cranberries

Eat Local, Health, Paula Martin, Recipe

Did you know that The American Cranberry is native to Michigan? While we are not the national leader in growing this fruit, our sandy soil, access to water and climate make them part of our fruit belt with major future growing potential.  When you follow the seasons to guide your meals and menu planning, it is no surprise that the cranberry is part of our nation’s traditions.