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Grow Benzie Food Truck Continues at Sara Hardy Farmers Market

Event, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Food Trucks, Guest Post, Loghan Call, Traverse City

Taste the Local Difference is excited to announce that The Grow Benzie Food Truck will continue brunch at the Sara Hardy Farmers Market on Wednesdays from 8 – Noon for the month of October! Stop by the market to enjoy hyper local, vegan brunch featuring produce from many of the vendors who sell at the market, including: Loma Farm, Lakeview Hill Farm, Second Spring Farm, Heartwood Forest Farm. With a strong commitment to sourcing local, 100% of the produce is sourced locally and 95% of all ingredients within Michigan!

As the season changes, Chef Loghan will have delicious hot menu items to keep you warm and satisfied as you browse the market! Be on the lookout for brunch burritos, hot soups, spiced cider, Higher Grounds coffee and their very popular tacos in the coming weeks!

Chef Loghan Call is the owner and regenerative foods chef of Planted Cuisine. He has been working closely with Grow Benzie for the last several months and has become well known for his hyperlocal, plant-based fare. 

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Tom’s Food Markets: More than Just a Market

Emma Beauchamp, Find Local Food, Retail, Stories, Traverse City

In 1946, Tom and Eva Deering founded Deering’s Market on 11th St in Traverse City. Originally, it served as a small corner market specializing in meat products near downtown. Fifteen years later, in 1961, Tom’s Food Market’s first full sized grocery store was built on the west side of town. Since then, Tom’s Food Markets has grown into six full size grocery stores throughout the region. Despite their expansion, Tom’s has continued its focus on supporting the Traverse City area community.

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Enjoy Certified Local Wine Dinners at Chateau Chantal this Fall

Bailey Samp, Drinks, Event, Find Local Food, Traverse City, Wine

Chateau Chantal Winery & Inn is situated high on a ridge overlooking the rolling vineyards and cherry orchards of Old Mission Peninsula, a perfect backdrop to experience Fall in Northern Michigan.  Enjoy the sweeping views of East and West Grand Traverse Bay while enjoying local food and the perfect wine pairing that awaits you. With a 25-year legacy of food and wine education through cooking classes, pairing seminars, wine dinners and gourmet breakfast preparation, Chateau Chantal will impress with an elevating wine experience and a relaxed atmosphere.

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Rove Estate & Winery: Part of Traverse City’s Iconic Wine Scene

Drinks, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Jeni Schmidt, Local Ingredients, Specialty Producers, Traverse City, Wine

What makes northern Michigan so iconic? One could argue that it’s the 105 miles of “fresh coast” surrounded by countless hiking trails, ski hills, lake life, and the world-renowned Sleeping Bear Dunes. Others would say it’s the dozens of festivals hosted throughout the year including the Cherry Festival, Film Festival, or Polka Festival. Some may say it’s simply the diverse foodie options served by that sweet midwestern hospitality. But, only one thing pairs well with all of these iconic experiences: wine. Rove Estate & Winery in northern Michigan is an absolute staple of all things Traverse City, therefore may be one of the most iconic locations of them all.

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Redefining Leadership

Jobs, Traverse City, Tricia Phelps

Imagine a leader of a successful company. They’re probably assertive, right? Have indisputable self confidence, maybe erring on the side of ego, and often lead the company with an iron fist.

It’s true, a lot of businesses have leaders that resemble this description, but one thing is likely – the leader you imagined was probably a man. For generations, women have faced barriers to obtaining careers with a leadership role. Even when they ultimately reach the position, women still encounter a double-edged sword based on the belief that leaders take one single form.

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Cheers to 29 Years at Poppycock’s!

Drinks, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Traverse City, Whitney Butzier Biggs
Our desire is to culture a unique dining experience where exciting, fresh flavors entice your palette and senses. At Poppycock’s, our Executive Chef Chris Day focuses on fresh local ingredients to create his artfully elevated cuisine.
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As Fresh as Possible: Garden 2 Table Dinner Series

Bailey Samp, Drinks, Event, farm-to-table, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Stories, Traverse City

Are you ready to experience a culinary adventure like no other and enjoy fresh produce created in the backyard of northern Michigan? TC Community Garden is hosting a series of local dinners this Summer that will give you the opportunity to enjoy a communal dinner with friends in a community garden, enjoy produce that is grown by community members, and take a garden tour!

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Local Shade of Pale

Drinks, farm-to-table, Find Local Food, Simon Joseph, Specialty Producers, Traverse City

Food Philosophy
I personally think it is not only important for us to use as much locally produced food and products as possible, but we also have a responsibility to be good partners with all food businesses in the area. It helps elevate the whole industry in a way that benefits us beyond dollars. Eating local should be looked at as the norm, not the exception.

Drink Local
When we re-opened Harvest in its new location in 2017, we also added a liquor license and one of our first priorities was to source beer and cider from local producers. That led to the idea of having a beer brewed specifically for us. It only made sense that we would take the idea as far as we could by then brewing the beer with local malt and hops. Because of the amazing relationships in the food and brewing community in Traverse City this was not a tall order. Working with Earthen Ales, Great Lakes Malting, and Michigan Hop Alliance we were able to brew a beer that is almost entirely made out of locally sourced ingredients, aptly named Local Shade of Pale. It’s really amazing to think of how far and fast the brewing culture has come in just a few short years. We feel so fortunate to not only enjoy the work of these great folks but also to be able to collaborate with them to create something that exemplifies our common goals.

Q&A with our Partners
Michigan Hop Alliance
Brian Tennis, FounderBrian Tennis Michigan Hop Alliance

Established: Michigan Hop Alliance was started 7 years ago as a way for hop farmers to work together to bring their hops to the brewing community as economically as possible. New Mission Organics was started 13 years ago, and has been growing hops for 10 years. New Mission Organics was the original farm name.

What makes Northern Michigan hops unique and great?
The 45th Parallel has historically been the sweet spot for growing hops, both in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. We have the perfect climate, including soil, water, heat, and day lengths, to be able to grow a world-class product. We are also lucky to be able to work with some of the best farmers in Michigan, and can leverage their knowledge and expertise to our overall farming operation.  

What does it mean to you to be involved in brewing a beer for a local restaurant with local brewers and local malt providers with your local hops?
We have been growing hops for nearly a decade, and have sold over a million pounds of hops over the years, but there is still something that is so very special and rewarding as tasting a beer that was made from hops that you had a hand in. To me, that excitement never gets old. These brewers and restaurateurs are not just accounts, but my friends, and I share their passion. My very first commercial sale was to Short’s Brewing Company and was used in a harvest ale called Kind Ale. I still remember the very first time I saw our hopyard name up on the chalkboard in Bellaire and the rush I had from tasting that beer. That proud moment doesn’t leave you.

Great Lakes Malting Company
Jeff Malkiewicz, President & Co-Founder

TLD.GLMC-8Established: Great Lakes Malting Company has been crafting great malt from the Great Lakes since 2016, with the mission of producing the finest malts right here in Traverse City and connecting breweries and distilleries to the region with locally-grown and processed ingredients.

Why do you believe in locally sourcing barley?
The answer is two-fold, economic and sustainability. When brewers/distillers use locally grown and processed ingredients, all of that money stays in the community and is re-invested in the community. Also, sourcing locally reduces carbon footprint through reduced transport. Most ingredients that are currently being used by breweries and distilleries come from the Western US/Western Canada and from overseas.

Describe your relationships with local farmers.
One of the things I enjoy most about this opportunity is my interaction with farmers. After all, quality malt starts at the farm. We can’t produce the finest malts without the finest grains! I have spent a lot of time working with farmers and educating them to help ensure their success in growing malting-grade barley. However, farming is not always easy and sometimes difficult conversations take place. This is where mutual trust and respect are critical to maintaining and growing these relationships.

Earthen Ales
Jamie Kidwell-Brix, Co-Founder/Brewer

earthenales brew dayEstablished: Earthen Ales opened its doors in December 2016. Owners Andrew and Jamie started Earthen Ales because they love making beer.They were both brewing before they met each other, and when they met and started brewing together – it got out of control, and Earthen Ales was born!

What makes Northern Michigan beer unique and why is using locally sourced ingredients important to you?
The agricultural diversity of the region and access to fresh, clean water makes northern Michigan a great place to make beer. The abundance of ingredients and resources in the area have led to strong and creative food and beverage community; we love being a piece of that community, and hope we’ll contribute to making it even stronger. We used to work in the sustainability field in our former day jobs, and we’ve carried this mindset into brewing. We brew beer with a sense of place, and we’re inspired by the place we live. What better way to showcase this then working with ingredients that are native to this place.

What does it mean to you to be involved in brewing a beer for a local restaurant with local hops providers and local malt providers?
Brewing beer for a restaurant like Harvest is a new extension of our community. We’re excited that Harvest embraces the use of local ingredients daily and wanted to explore this further by collaborating on a beer with us. It’s great to align with other businesses on similar values and ideas. Harvest was excited and inspired by the diversity of new hops in the region, and was particularly excited about using a new varietal called Green Bastard – we’d never used this hop before. And guess what, we like making beer and trying new things too!

Local Shade of Pale is available on-tap at Harvest, Traverse City, as of April 5th.

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Simon Joseph is the Owner/Managing Partner/Executive Chef of Roaming HarvestHarvestGaijinAlley’s Market . 

Photo Credits: Just In Time Hospitality and Brian Tennis of Michigan Hop Alliance

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Pets Naturally: Not All Treats Are Created Equal

Andrea Margelis, Find Local Food, Guest Post, Retail, Specialty Producers, Stories, Traverse City

As pet parents, we want to provide our furry family members with their best possible life. When it comes to choosing the best diet for our dogs, we research excessively and get advice from our trusted veterinarians, however, sometimes the treats we purchase lack proper attention when it comes to ingredients. Pet parents tend to grab any box off the shelf at the grocery or pet store without taking the time to read the ingredient label. Many treats contain artificial ingredients and are not fit for human consumption, so why would we feed these to our family members? If you can’t eat them yourself, your dog most likely shouldn’t either.