Know Your Farmer: Hallstedt Homestead

Find Local Food, Julia Linder, Know Your Farmer, Uncategorized

For all sweet cherry lovers out there, Hallstedt Homestead is the place for you. The Northport orchard, run by Sarah and Phil Hallstedt, is a new haven for sweet cherries in the heart of the cherry capital. They grow eight varieties of sweet cherries, including six varieties available for U-Pick.

Detroit’s Top 3 Most Walkable Foodie Neighborhoods

Detroit, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Nick Jones, Uncategorized

Detroit is the Motor City but, believe it or not, you don’t need to drive everywhere. Renowned restaurants, farmers markets, and tasting rooms can be found along easily walkable routes. So call a rideshare, grab your bike, or hop on public transit, because you won’t need your car to enjoy a leisurely summer walk in one of these local food hot spots. 

Growing Good Habits: Headstart visits Sara Hardy Farmers Market

Uncategorized

With support from the Building Healthy Communities (BHC) grant, two Northwest Michigan Community Action Agency Head Start programs will be improving their culture around health, local food and classroom nutrition education in the upcoming months. The BHC program focuses on are incorporating nutrition education into their curriculum. They do this by offering hands-on taste tests and cooking lessons of vegetable and bean based recipes. By focusing on these topics, children and their families will be able to incorporate what they learn through Head Start at home. The grant also includes funding to offer children and their families a first-hand experience interacting with local farmers at the Sara Hardy Farmers Market in downtown Traverse City.  

Know Your Farmer: Open Sky Organic Farm

Find Local Food, Julia Linder, Know Your Farmer, Stories, Uncategorized

Open Sky Organic Farm is a certified organic farm four miles from Cross Village, Michigan. Together, Sam and Susan Sharp produce a variety of flowers, herbs, and vegetables, including garlic, snap peas, and spring mix. 

Sam and Susan put their roots down in Northern Michigan years ago because of their love for the land, seasonal changes, and the people. Susan says the pace of life up north just resonated with them. The two of them started farming several years ago while Susan was still teaching. She has since retired, and this is their third year farming their land near Cross Village. The 10-acre piece used to be an old fallow hay field, whose soil had been left stripped and in need of some TLC. Susan and Sam went to work building their soil and bringing life back to the property, and they now have four acres in production.

United Way of Washtenaw Leads Strategies for Success

Economy, Get Involved, Health, Learn More, Uncategorized

By 2030, we aspire to live in a community where your zip code no longer determines your opportunity in life. United Way of Washtenaw County fights for the health, education, and financial stability of all people. Our mission is to CONNECT people, resources, and organizations TOGETHER to create a thriving community for EVERYONE.

Give Your Kidneys a Break With Glazed Carrots

Eat Local, Find Local Food, Health, Paula Martin, Recipes, Uncategorized

Keep your blood pressure in check by eating plenty of local produce– your kidney will thank you for it. Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables ensures there is adequate potassium to balance out the negative effect salt has on our blood pressure. Kidneys regulate our blood pressure, so give them a hand, eat more potassium rich foods so they don’t have to work so hard. During March and early April, up your potassium levels by enjoying storage potatoes, onions, carrots and sweet potatoes. Dried cherries and apricots are also potassium powerhouses.

Crop Spot: Garlic

Find Local Food, Health, Kelly Wilson, Learn More, Recipe, Uncategorized

What is related to onions, leeks and lilies, keeps mythical creatures at bay, enhances the flavor of many dishes, and has antimicrobial properties? If you guessed Allium sativum (aka garlic), then you are correct!

Hailing from Central Asia and Northern Iran, records show garlic has been cultivated and used for culinary and medicinal purposes for nearly 5,000 years. There are two subspecies of garlic which all varieties can be categorized into: hardneck or softneck. Hardneck garlic produces a hard central stalk and scape (which can be harvested for a delicious vegetable side dish or pesto). Hardneck garlic tends to be a bit more flavorful and have larger, easier to peel cloves than softneck varieties. Softneck garlic has no hard central stalk, smaller cloves, and is the type we typically see in the grocery store (Note: nearly all garlic in US grocery stores is imported from China).

Pop Up Farmers Markets: Call for Local Food Vendors

Bailey Samp, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Uncategorized

Do you have a passion for educating kids about local food? Do you want to help TLD promote our regions bountiful farmers’ markets? After an overwhelming positive response, we’ve decided to host 5 more Pop-up Farmers Markets this Spring but we can’t do it without your help!

Elegance & Good Taste in Hamtramck

Drinks, Edible WOW, Find Local Food, Nina Ignaczak, Southeast Michigan, Uncategorized

An early October sun is setting over the storefronts of Joseph Campau Avenue in Hamtramck. It’s Friday night, and small groups of people filter casually into Peter Dalinowski’s permanent pop-up venue, (revolver). A few guests carry their own bottles of wine as they are seated family-style around candlelit wood block tables. It’s the first seating of the season after a brief summer hiatus, and the anticipation is palpable.