MAEAP Verification is a Worthy Investment for Your Farm

Agriculture, Environment

For this farmer, MAEAP recognition proves he’s doing the right things to keep his farm running for another 100 years

Ron Stadler’s family has been farming since 1896. The family farm sits on 120 acres in Monroe County and has seen its fair share of cash crops and livestock come and go over the years. Nowadays, Ron’s focus is on growing corn, soybeans, and produce. He’s proud to carry on the family farming tradition and does what he can to care for his land, so it stays healthy and productive.

That’s why Ron decided to get involved with the Michigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program (MAEAP). A voluntary program, MAEAP helps Michigan farmers adopt cost-effective practices that reduce erosion and runoff into ponds, streams, and rivers.

6 Ways to Handle CSA Overload

Eat Local, Find Local Food, Health, Know Your Farmer, Learn More, Mieko Diener

I love my CSA, for getting the freshest local veggies, knowing that I am supporting the farmers in my community, connecting with likeminded neighbors and investing in my local food system – it’s the best. But sometimes I get a little overwhelmed with just how many gorgeous veggies I come home with every week, and I know I’m not alone. Here are a few tips and tricks, if you’re like me and you love your CSA, but need strategies for using everything effectively.

Crop Spot: Pawpaw a.k.a. “Michigan Banana”

Crop Spot, Eat Local, Find Local Food, Learn More, Mieko Diener

If you’ve never heard of the pawpaw, you are not alone. This mysterious fruit is native to the Midwest, but defies commercial production and is rarely seen in stores. However, with increasing interest in native crops and local agriculture, you can expect to hear more and more about the pawpaw, officially named Asimina triloba, and with many fun, colloquial names including “Michigan banana” and “hillbilly mango”.  

Combating Climate Change: Creating Climate-resilient Orchards

Agriculture, Climate Change, Environment, Julia Linder, Learn More

In my previous post of this Climate Change series, (see the first and second post here), I discussed how tree fruit growers in Michigan are faced with adapting to a “new normal” due to climate change. Pest and disease profiles are shifting, frost dates are less predictable, and precipitation is becoming more erratic. Growers adapt to these changes by implementing management strategies like wind machines and irrigation systems. 

National Farmers Union Hosting D.C. Fly-In

Agriculture, Environment, Find Local Food, Kristine Ranger, Learn More

Michigan Farmers Union is seeking participants to advocate for family farmers and their communities by joining members from across the country in Washington, D.C., September 8th-11th for the 2019 Fall Legislative Fly-In.

Know Your Farmer: Nature & Nurture Seeds

Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Julia Linder, Know Your Farmer

MMeet the crew at Nature & Nurture Seeds! Together with volunteers and interns, co-founders of Nature & Nurture Seeds Erica Kempter and Mike Levine run their organic and sustainably-grown seed company out of their Dexter farm.  

A New Normal for Michigan Orchards

Climate Change, Environment, Julia Linder, Learn More

This is the second post of a three-part series. Before reading this, make sure you read the first post of the series here! To quickly recap, in the last article I mentioned how climate change will have unique impacts on tree fruit agriculture due to long-term growing requirements of growing perennials. This means that fruit growers also perceive unique risks from climate change, which is what this post will dive into.

A Farmer’s Diary: Beginning Farmer Institute, Part 3

Event, Get Involved, Learn More, Molly Stepanski

Our third and final Beginning Farmer Institute (BFI) session took us to Washington state to talk business formation, business planning and long-term health, land tenure, credit, taxation, liability, regulatory compliance, farming cooperatives, and the logistics behind one of the oldest continuously operated public farmers’ markets in the United States. You think you know how to farm, start a small business, and market your product? Think again. This program will change your trajectory, and it has for our farm. Not to mention we now have a long list of reliable farmers/producers from around the country that can help us with our farming questions for life!

7 Tips to Make the Most of your CSA Share

Eat Local, Environment, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Kelly Wilson, Local Ingredients

Spring has officially sprung! As you shake off the winter haze, now is the perfect time to start planning thinking about where your food is coming from this summer. Which community farmers market will you attend? Will you plant your own garden? Should you join a CSA? There are so many options for accessing local food!