Dietitian’s Corner: Bone Health

Eat Local, Health, Paula Martin, Recipes

Bone Health is good health. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 1 of 2 women and 1 of 4 men over the age of 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. A healthful eating plan and weight-bearing activities are important to ensure strong bones. With spring greens and local dairy now available at the Farmers Market, it’s easy to support local producers while taking care of your bones.

Eat Small: 3 Reasons to Cook Rabbit or Poultry Tonight

Eat Local, Environment, Health, Nick Jones, Recipes

Everyone is asking questions about meat lately. Is it healthy? Is it sustainable? Should we be eating it all?

While you consider what to put on the table for dinner tonight, take a minute to consider skipping the usual beef, pork, or lamb, and opt for something new.

Here are three good reasons to choose local rabbit for dinner tonight.

Give Your Kidneys a Break With Glazed Carrots

Eat Local, Find Local Food, Health, Paula Martin, Recipes, Uncategorized

Keep your blood pressure in check by eating plenty of local produce– your kidney will thank you for it. Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables ensures there is adequate potassium to balance out the negative effect salt has on our blood pressure. Kidneys regulate our blood pressure, so give them a hand, eat more potassium rich foods so they don’t have to work so hard. During March and early April, up your potassium levels by enjoying storage potatoes, onions, carrots and sweet potatoes. Dried cherries and apricots are also potassium powerhouses.

Crop Spotlight: Turnips

Eat Local, Farmers Markets, Find Local Food, Health, Kelly Wilson, Recipes

In the dead of winter, we long for the abundance of summer gardens and farmers markets. While their bounty is hard to outshine, it is amazing to take stock of, and appreciate, how much variety is still available this time of year. Season extending techniques like hoophouses (aka high tunnels) allow us to have fresh tender greens, spinach, and cold sweetened carrots. We’re also able to find a wide range of storage vegetables: cabbage, beets, carrots, garlic, onions, potatoes, sweet potatoes, rutabaga, kohlrabi, and more! And don’t forget this month’s crop spotlight: the humble turnip.

Adding Local to the School Lunch Menu with 10 Cents A Meal

Eat Local, Economy, Environment, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Kelly Wilson

Michigan is the second most agriculturally diverse state in the US and a national leader in the cultivation of apples, asparagus, blueberries, tart cherries, green beans, dry beans, potatoes and squash. Despite our rich produce production, most Michiganders still do not meet the recommended intake of fruits and vegetables and 32% of our children are overweight or obese.

Fruit and vegetables are the cornerstone of good health and lifelong health patterns are often established in childhood. Exposure to healthy habits at an early age can encourage long term health. One of the best places for this positive exposure to occur is in the school setting. Fortunately, a statewide pilot program, 10 Cents a Meal for School Kids & Farms, is supporting schools in infusing more fresh, Michigan grown produce into their menus.

Local Food Heads Back to School

Economy, Find Local Food, Kelly Wilson, Learn More

The days are getting shorter and the smell of drying leaves and woodsmoke is in the air. Fall is here and that means it’s back to school for Michigan’s 1.5 million public school students. For many of us, back to school conjures up a variety of images and smells: freshly sharpened pencils, crisp notebooks, new backpacks, and the infamous mystery meals served in the cafeteria. For many of Michigan’s students, however, the school year also brings with it the tantalizing smells and flavors of locally sourced, and carefully prepared, food.

Cultivating Health through School Gardens

Benefit, farm-to-table, Find Local Food, Health, Marissa Natzke, Paula Martin, Stories

Traverse Bay Area Intermediate School District (TBA ISD) is using gardening as a tool to improve student health. Thanks to SNAP-ED funding through the USDA and the Michigan Fitness Foundation, TBA ISD implements a program called LifeSPAN, which performs cooking and nutrition lessons year round in the classroom to increase students fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity levels. Currently, they’re running summer garden camps where kids partake in nutrition lessons, help in school gardens, and cook healthy meals using produce they harvest.

Good Food, Better Health

Event, Find Local Food, Get Involved, Health, Kelly Wilson, Learn More, Southeast Michigan

Baste. Blanch. Chiffonade. Roast. Saute. Zest.

Ever see these terms on recipes and wonder “what the heck does that mean?” ? Well, if you have, you are not alone! One of the biggest challenges many of my clients face when changing their diet is navigating the kitchen and new recipes. Culinary education is no longer a staple in public education and our lives have become increasingly hectic. As a result, many people feel intimidated and overwhelmed in the kitchen and with cooking for themselves.