MAEAP Verification is a Worthy Investment for Your Farm

Agriculture, Environment

For this farmer, MAEAP recognition proves he’s doing the right things to keep his farm running for another 100 years

Ron Stadler’s family has been farming since 1896. The family farm sits on 120 acres in Monroe County and has seen its fair share of cash crops and livestock come and go over the years. Nowadays, Ron’s focus is on growing corn, soybeans, and produce. He’s proud to carry on the family farming tradition and does what he can to care for his land, so it stays healthy and productive.

That’s why Ron decided to get involved with the Michigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program (MAEAP). A voluntary program, MAEAP helps Michigan farmers adopt cost-effective practices that reduce erosion and runoff into ponds, streams, and rivers.

Chefs in the Garden: Growing the Community

Agriculture, Eat Local, Emma Beauchamp, Event, Find Local Food

Get your tickets to Growing Hope‘s Chefs in the Garden dinner on October 13! Held on the grounds of their sprawling urban farm, attendees will enjoy a multi-course meal under the hoophouse. This year, area chefs Ji Hye of Miss Kim and Brandon Johns of Grange Kitchen & Bar sponsored the events*. Much of the menus highlights locally grown produce, some of it even coming from the Growing Hope farm.

A Word on Waste: Part III

Find Local Food, Food Waste, Learn More, Mieko Diener, Recipes

This article is part of a four-part series on buying, storing, preserving and composting foods to prevent waste

We have an extreme problem with inefficiency when it comes to food production across the globe. The resulting excess usage of natural resources has an enormous effect on the environment. As individuals we can take small actions that add up to big improvements. Americans waste about a pound of food per day and fruits and vegetables are some of the most frequently wasted foods. Here are some ways to consider preserving food so it gets eaten instead of tossed. 

Crop Spot: Romanesco

Agriculture, Crop Spot, Eat Local, Find Local Food, Mieko Diener

Romanesco hits a sweet spot for me as a nutrition science geek. It is beautiful, nutritious and delicious, but best of all, the chartreuse buds spiral into Fibonacci sequence fractals. What more could you want, except for maybe some ideas on how to prepare it? 

A Word on Waste: Part IV

Agriculture, Authors, Climate Change, Environment, Food Waste

This article is part of a four-part series on buying, storing, preserving and composting foods to prevent waste

There is no ‘away’ to throw things. When food ends up in landfills it decomposes anaerobically which releases methane, a greenhouse gas 25x more effective at trapping heat than carbon dioxide. Since Americans throw away around 150,000 tons of food every day, the effect on climate change is significant. Even when we do all we can to reduce food waste by buying only what we need, storing and preserving foods properly, we still end up with inedible scraps or things that have gone off. Here are some basics on composting to divert waste from the landfill.